Monday, November 1, 2010

Passionate Yoga Talk

There is a unique event happening at Yogaview in Chicago this weekend that I’d like to tell you about. I think that it’ll be pretty interesting. Definitely worth checking out if you like to think about wider implications of yoga practice, and how we might want to consider using our minds to make the world a better place.

Joel Kramer and Diana Alstad, authors of ‘The Passionate Mind Revisited’ and other books are offering a series of talks about relationships and spirituality. They have interesting things to say about power dynamics in relationships in their recent book, so I’m looking forward to hearing what they have to say in person.

I see it as a way to exercise my mental muscle. I’m not going because I’m some kind of Joel and Diana convert or anything (I don't think that that's what they're going for anyway). I’m just interested in hearing what they have to offer. Perhaps my understanding might grow. I think there’s a little something hidden in going to hear a “spiritual” talk, like perhaps an anticipation (or fear) of being “converted” or something (that might keep some people away unnecessarily).

I think it could be helpful to address spiritual concerns without the umbrella of religion. It’s definitely a touchy subject, but for the fearlessly caring and interested people around, this could prove to be an intriguing discussion. We’ll see…

Read more about this exciting event (there is also an option to sign up) here:

I mean, how often do we really talk openly about this stuff? Maybe I'll see you there. I hope it's fun.

2 comments:

YogaforCynics said...

I'd certainly be there if it wasn't such a long drive...

Kramer and Alstad are interesting, even if I don't quite buy everything they say...then, I'm that way with just about everybody. I tend to worry more about being irritated by heavy handed religiosity at "spiritual" talks than converted. Ultimately, I think it comes down to whether I feel like the speaker respects and is open to whatever I might think or believe, so that it's more of a sense of "here's my view, which you might find interesting" as opposed to "here's the truth which you need to learn and accept." But, maybe that's just the Quaker in me...

Bob Weisenberg said...

Hi, Brooks.

Like you, I think we should be open to any spirituality that, in practice not just theory, helps people lead better lives. Labels don't mean anything to me, only what kind of people does this spiritual system produce? So I end up seeing good in a lot of things that other people reject for various reasons.

Bob W.